Food Service Inspection Results

Each local health department in the state conducts routine inspections of each food facility in their jurisdiction. The purpose of these inspections is to determine if the facilities are operating in a safe and sanitary manner.

An inspection report may not be representative of the overall, long-term conditions within a facility. It is important to understand that the inspection information provided here shows only the conditions of the facility at the time of the inspection.

A single inspection report should not be used to evaluate the overall operation of an establishment. Looking at a facility’s inspection results over a period of time gives a more accurate picture of that facility’s commitment to compliance. It is also important to note that a violation at a facility that is part of a restaurant/grocery chain indicates a problem only at that particular location.

View Online Inspection Results

INSPECTION PROCESS

Inspection frequency and license fees are based on the Risk Level Classification determined by the types of food preparation that take place, including reheating and hot holding.

If you see an unsafe practice in a licensed restaurant, store, or food booth, call the Wood County Health Department at 419-354-2702. You do not need to give your name. A sanitarian will follow up with an inspection.

Facility inspections are conducted one to four times per year, depending on the complexity of a facility’s menu and their potential risk of a foodborne illness. Inspection reports will become available throughout the year as inspections are conducted per the frequency requirements.

Types of Violations:

    • Critical Violations: Violations of the Food Regulations, which, if left uncorrected, are more likely than other violations to directly contribute to food contamination or illness. Examples include improper temperature control of food and the improper cooking, cooling, refrigeration, or reheating of food. Such problems can create environments that cause pathogens (bacteria/viruses) to grow and thrive, which put consumers at risk for food-borne illness.
    • Non-Critical Violations: Violations not directly related to the cause of foodborne illness, however, if uncorrected, could affect the operation of the facility and lead to critical violations. Examples include a lack of facility cleanliness and maintenance or improper cleaning of nonfood-contact equipment.


Types of Inspections:

  • Pre-license Inspection: This inspection is not required, but may be conducted by the local health department prior to issuing a license to a new Food Service Operation or Retail Food Establishment. The purpose of this inspection is to provide consultation and education to the operator.
  • Thirty-Day Inspection: This is a standard inspection that must be conducted no more than thirty days after a license is issued to a new Food Service Operation or Retail Food Establishment.
  • Routine: This is a scheduled inspection, unannounced to the restaurant. An inspector will conduct a complete inspection covering all items in the regulations for compliance.
  • Follow-up Inspection: This is an inspection for the specific purpose of re-inspecting items that were not in compliance at the time of the routine inspection.
  • Critical Item or Critical Procedures Evaluation: This is an inspection during which only compliance with critical sections of the regulations or critical procedures are evaluated and documented. This inspection focuses on those portions of the regulations where violations could cause food-borne illness.
  • Training: The inspector visits the restaurant to present a formal training event for the restaurant’s staff.
  • Complaint: This is an inspection conducted as a result of a complaint received by the health department. The specifics of the complaint will be evaluated and discussed with the person in charge.

Clean Plate Award

The purpose of this distinction is to award those facilities who are dedicated to excellent sanitation and food safety knowledge. This award will be offered on an annual basis, and recipients will receive a certificate of excellence, recognition from the Wood County Combined General Health Department, and may also receive local media coverage.

Applying for the Clean Plate Award is voluntary and completing the application is the responsibility of the licensee. 

Download the Clean Plate Award Application

Facilities must:

  • Be a Food Service Operation or Retail Food Establishment.
  • Have the same license for at least 1 full licensing year.
  • Have no confirmed foodborne illness within 2 years.
  • Have no administrative hearings and no confirmed complaints in the past 2 licensing periods.
  • Meet the requirements below based on your facility’s Risk Level.
  • Based on the previous year standard inspection. (A copy of the inspections must accompany the application.)
  • Zero (0) Critical violations
  • Two (2) or less Non-Critical violations
  • Based on the combined violation totals from two previous year standard inspections. (A copy of the inspections must accompany the application.)
  • One (1) or less Critical violations
  • Three (3) or less Non-Critical violations
  • At least one (1) manager at the facility must be certified in Level 2 Food Safety. (A copy of the Ohio Department of Health certificate must be provided with the application.)
  • Based on the combined violation totals from two previous year standard inspections. (A copy of the inspections must accompany the application.)
  • Two (2) or less Critical violations
  • Three (3) or less Non-Critical violations
  • At least two (2) managers at the facility must be certified in food safety. (A copy of the Ohio Department of Health certificate must be provided with the application.)
  • Based on combined violation total from two standard inspections conducted by Wood County Health Department in the previous year. (A copy of the inspections must accompany the application.)
  • Zero (0) Critical violations
  • Three (3) or less Non-Critical violations

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